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Archive for month: November, 2017

When I started walking the talk about the wonders of snowmobiling in Abitibi-Témiscamingue – Part 2

When I started walking the talk about the wonders of snowmobiling in Abitibi-Témiscamingue – Part 2

Three days ago, I was preparing for my first snowmobiling experience (Read When I started walking the talk about the wonders of snowmobiling in Abitibi-Témiscamingue – Part 1). My uncle, Yves, his daughter and one of her friends, a couple of my uncle’s friends, Marco and Danielle, my sister, Kim, and I had planned to travel out to the Pourvoirie des Îles du Lac Duparquet and come back the next day. In all, the trip would cover 440 km; my sister and I, who had never snowmobiled, were to spell each other off driving the machines. Three days and 440 km later, I can now safely brag about how wonderful sledding is in Abitibi-Témiscamingue because I have actually experienced it!

ABITIBI-TÉMISCAMINGUE: A SNOWMOBILERS’ PARADISE …FOR NOVICES TOO!

People who say that Abitibi-Témiscamingue is a snowmobiling paradise are right! I felt totally safe and in control, which was so reassuring for a first experience. Of course, I have nothing to compare it to, because I have no experience sledding in other areas, but I can assure you that I was blown away by what I saw and experienced! The vegetation and the scenery are breathtaking and changing constantly. The trails are undulating and winding in places and straight and true in others, but always very wide. As a novice, I found this quite reassuring because I was never concerned about catching an oncoming snowmobile. Also, the frequency and quality of the signage was impressive. I was travelling at my own speed, which was very different from Yves and Marco’s, who’ve been sledding for about 20 years, or Danielle’s, who has had her own machine for six years, so I’d lose sight of them occasionally. So, even if I lost sight of Danielle bouncing along on her sled or taking a tight turn, I knew what was coming on a corner or at the bottom of a hill. The little yellow signs were always there to give me a heads up! There were numerous rest stops and huts, providing ample opportunity to stop safely and often to prevent fatigue.

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One of the numerous rest stops in the snowmobile trails, in Rivière-Héva.

WE ALWAYS NEED A GOOD YARN

It’s a fact. The trips that include an unexpected adventure or leave you with a great story to tell are the most memorable. And I can assure you that this is one we will definitely remember! Kim and I were not the only novices in the group. It was also the first time snowmobiling for my uncle’s daughter and her friend. They were two very excited little 9-year-olds as we headed out on our adventure together. About 20 minutes into the trip, we stopped to check that everything was going well. We discovered that their enthusiasm had waned and their little faces were now

an interesting shade of green or white. Motion sickness had joined our expedition! After a 15-minute break, we started out again only to stop about 20 minutes later. The girls had both brought their breakfast up on the blanket that was keeping them warm. That was the beginning of the story. Every 20 minutes, we stopped to clean up the vomit, and console and encourage the girls. We finally stopped in Cadillac for a rest and some lunch, which was good for everyone. The girls were feeling a lot better by then and even fell asleep in the sled after lunch, which allowed us to travel a fair distance without stopping.

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From the inside of  the sleigh

Then we came to another lake. The crossing woke the girls up and they promptly threw up again; they also got scared. So, at Preissac, just over the halfway mark, we decided to spell each other off in the passenger sleigh. Yves climbed in with his daughter’s friend and, 30 minutes later, all was well. Her fear had disappeared and she felt good. Then it was my uncle’s daughter’s turn… and mine! It brought back childhood memories of being small and not able to see anything, as well as a few added bonuses: the smell in the sleigh was awful, my cousin’s motion sickness was still very much on board, and the suspension was broken (the sleigh didn’t care for my uncle’s powerful build). I must admit, even as an adult, I HATE sleighs!

We finally reached the Pourvoirie des Îles du Lac Duparquet where we would bed down for the night; the girls played all evening. Sunday morning, my cousin’s grandparents came and rescued the girls from another day of torture on the snowmobile. They drove to Duparquet and took them and the stinky sled back to Val-d’Or. So, on the return trip, we were down to five adults and four machines.

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The view from our room at the Pourvoirie des Iles du Lac Duparquet. In addition of the great landscape, the food was delicious and service was top-notch!

With stars in their eyes, so many sledders have described the sense of freedom, spirit of camaraderie and stunning landscapes that draw them to snowmobiling. The experience certainly matched the descriptions I’d heard over the years. On my machine, I felt as though I were floating on the snow, flying through the trees. On my own and surrounded by the strength and magnificence of Mother Nature, I was indeed free. And I met two wonderful people: Marco and Danielle are simple, funny, considerate and passionate souls and lovely travelling companions. Now, I will be able to describe the snowmobiling trails in Abitibi-Témiscamingue from personal experience, with stars in my eyes. I’ll be able to explain why it is so much fun, describe the beauty out there and talk about the camaraderie that reigns. And, believe me, I’ll do it with passion!

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Because we also need a good yarn for Sunday, my uncle had a little incident on that day!

When I started walking the talk about the wonders of snowmobiling in Abitibi-Témiscamingue – Part 1

When I started walking the talk about the wonders of snowmobiling in Abitibi-Témiscamingue – Part 1

For a little over three years now, I’ve worked at the Val-d’Or Tourism and Convention Bureau. As part of my job, I often talk about snowmobiling in Val-d’Or and Abitibi-Témiscamingue, when I am on the road promoting our area or assisting a visitor at our tourist information office. I suggest itineraries, talk about how great and beautiful the snowmobile trails are, let people know which sections are more straightforward and which are more technical, but I had not actually done any sledding for about 20 years!

My only memories of snowmobiling are being bundled up in sheepskins, squished like sardines into the back of a passenger sleigh with my two sisters. Between our helmets, our size and the tight space, we couldn’t really see a thing. So, for me, snowmobiling was just a slow, uncomfortable way of getting to the family cottage.

I have always felt a little uneasy promoting snowmobiling when I don’t even do it. I feel as though I am talking through my hat. And then there was the fear of misleading someone despite carefully studying our regional snowmobile map and frequent conversations with local sledders who know the trails and the terrain. The doubt and uneasiness that have always lurked at the back of my mind will soon be gone because in less than 24 hours, I’m heading out for a weekend of snowmobiling!

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The stand of Tourisme Abitibi-Témiscamingue during a snowmobile show in Québec in 2015, which I participated to.

Along for the ride will be my uncle, his 7-year-old daughter, and one of her friends as well as a few of my uncle’s friends, all old hands at snowmobiling. My sister will join us too; she’s a real novice like me! We’ll leave from Val-d’Or, spend the night at the Pourvoirie des Îles du Lac Duparquet and head back to Val-d’Or the next day. We will cover about 440 km in all. I am very excited about finally getting out. By all accounts, sledding gives you a wonderful sense of freedom. I am also pretty nervous. Why? Because, for logistical reasons, my sister and I will need to spell each other off driving the snowmobile.

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Our itinirary

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My sister who were pretty happy to find all the equipment we will need for our trip.

So, I’ve been preparing for this excursion all week, pumped full of anticipation and adrenalin. My sister and I had to round up all the gear we needed: helmet, snowmobile suit, mittens, long underwear, woollen socks, snowmobiling map, etc. Since neither of us usually do any sledding, we got our parents’ old snowmobiling gear out of mothballs and borrowed the rest. We were all ready, with our mismatched suits straight out of the nineties, but still cozy warm. They did the trick! Stay tuned, Dear Reader, for a few gems in the second part of this blog! J To satisfy my need for a modicum of control over the unknown, I also sought out advice on driving a snowmobile. I contacted my uncle and my sister a million times to go over the various stages of our trip and to sort out the most minute details, right down to what we’d eat for breakfast the morning of our departure! Yup. Under stress, I can get a bit controlling…

Here we are now, just hours from leaving, and everything is just about ready to go. A few more things to buy, luggage to secure on the machines and then a good night’s sleep to be in good shape for the trip. As soon as I’m back, I’ll tell you about my first actual snowmobiling outing. For the first time, I’ll be able to give a firsthand account of the beauty of our land, the great camaraderie, the freedom we felt. And this time I’ll know what I am talking about!

Read the second part